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Career as a School psychologist



Who is a School psychologist?

School psychologists are uniquely qualified members of school teams that support students' ability to learn and teachers' ability to teach. They apply expertise in mental health, learning, and behavior, to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. School psychologists’ partner with families, teachers, school administrators, and other professionals to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments that strengthen connections between home, school, and the community.

What does a school psychologist do?

Assess an individual child's needs, limitations, and potential, using observation, review of school records, and consultation with parents and school personnel.

Attend workshops, seminars, or professional meetings to remain informed of new developments in school psychology.

Counsel children and families to help solve conflicts and problems in learning and adjustment.

Promote an understanding of child development and its relationship to learning and behavior.

Provide consultation to parents, teachers, administrators, and others on topics such as learning styles and behavior modification techniques.

Collaborate with other educational professionals to develop teaching strategies and school programs.

Compile and interpret students' test results, along with information from teachers and parents, to diagnose conditions and to help assess eligibility for special services.

Interpret test results and prepare psychological reports for teachers, administrators, and parents.

Develop individualized educational plans in collaboration with teachers and other staff members.

Refer students and their families to appropriate community agencies for medical, vocational, or social services.

Serve as a resource to help families and schools deal with crises, such as separation and loss.

Collect and analyze data to evaluate the effectiveness of academic programs and other services, such as behavioral management systems.

Provide educational programs on topics such as classroom management, teaching strategies, or parenting skills.

Report any pertinent information to the proper authorities in cases of child endangerment, neglect, or abuse.

Maintain student records, including special education reports, confidential records, records of services provided, and behavioral data.

Select, administer, and score psychological tests.

Initiate and direct efforts to foster tolerance, understanding, and appreciation of diversity in school communities.

Conduct research to generate new knowledge that can be used to address learning and behavior issues.

Design classes and programs to meet the needs of special students.

What is the workplace of a school psychologist like?

The vast majority of school psychologists work in K-12 public schools. They also provide services in a variety of other settings, including:

Private schools

Preschools

School district administration offices

Universities

School-based health and mental health centers

Community-based day treatment or residential clinics and hospitals

Juvenile justice programs

Independent private practice


Knowledge areas that need to be acquired –

School psychologists have advanced knowledge of theories and empirical findings in developmental and social psychology, and developmental psychopathology within cultural contexts, and in the areas of learning and effective instruction, effective schools, and family and parenting processes.

Math and Science

psychology

sociology and anthropology

This Psychology, Sociology & Anthropology course helps you quickly master the most important topics in these subjects. This mobile-friendly and comprehensive course contains engaging video lessons that can benefit students, casual learners and teachers.

Health

therapy and counseling

Professional therapy and counseling are treatments that can improve your mental wellness. These treatments can help people who are experiencing emotional or behavior problems. Also, it can help people who have a mental health disorder. Therapy is sometimes called psychotherapy or talk therapy

School psychologists support students, families, and teachers in academic and emotional success. ... Typical school psychologist job descriptions may include the following: Providing counseling for children and adolescents. Creating skill instruction and support plans.

Education and Training

teaching and course design

Using psychology in the classroom has always been an essential component of education, helping teachers to refine and develop instructional methods and create learning-rich classrooms. ... Psychology also helps teachers use measurements and assessments correctly, to better gauge where students are in their learning

Business

customer service

psychological services include, but are not limited to, assessment, intervention, consultation, program evaluation, crisis intervention and management, and parent support programs.

The use of psychology in business can allow you to motivate your employees, hire intelligently, expand and grow, negotiate contracts effectively, improve your staff's performance, market better, bring in more customers, and realize your goals.

Psychology - Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.

Therapy and Counseling - Knowledge of principles, methods, and procedures for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and for career counseling and guidance.

English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

Sociology and Anthropology - Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.

Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.

Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

Communications and Media - Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.

Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.

Skills

Active Listening— Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the

points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Critical Thinking— Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Reading Comprehension— Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Problem Solving

noticing a problem and figuring out the best way to solve it

Use reasoning to discover answers to problems.

Combine several pieces of information and draw conclusions.

Notice when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong.

Analyze ideas and use logic to determine their strengths and weaknesses.

Judge the costs and benefits of a possible action.

Recognize the nature of a problem.

Understand new information or materials by studying and working with them.

Follow guidelines to arrange objects or actions in a certain order.

Develop rules that group items in various ways.

Think of new ideas about a topic.

Recognize when important changes happen or are likely to happen in a system.

Identify what must be changed to reach goals.

Concentrate and not be distracted while performing a task.

Think of original, unusual, or creative ways to solve problems.

Social

understanding people's reactions

looking for ways to help people

Be aware of others’ reactions and understand the possible causes.

Look for ways to help people.

Change behavior in relation to others’ actions.

Persuade others to approach things differently.

Use several methods to learn or teach new things.

Solve problems by bringing others together to discuss differences.

Teach others how to do something.

PERCEIVE AND VISUALIZE

Identify a pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in distracting material.

Source: Illinois Career Information System (CIS) brought to you by Illinois Department of Employment Security.

MANAGE ONESELF, PEOPLE, TIME, AND THINGS

Check how well one is learning or doing something.

Manage the time of self and others.

Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Negotiation - Bringing others together and trying to reconcile differences.

Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.

Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.

Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

Persuasion - Persuading others to change their minds or behavior.

Learning Strategies - Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.

Instructing - Teaching others how to do something.

Systems Analysis - Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.

Systems Evaluation - Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.

Management of Personnel Resources - Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.

Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve

Abilities

Verbal

communicate by speaking

listen and understand what people say

Understand spoken information.

Listen to others and ask questions.

Speak clearly so listeners can understand.

Read and understand work-related materials.

Understand written information.

Write clearly so other people can understand.

Ideas and Logic

use rules to solve problems

make general rules or come up with answers from lots of detailed information

Use reasoning to discover answers to problems.

Combine several pieces of information and draw conclusions.

Notice when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong.

Analyze ideas and use logic to determine their strengths and weaknesses.

Judge the costs and benefits of a possible action.

Recognize the nature of a problem.

Understand new information or materials by studying and working with them.

Follow guidelines to arrange objects or actions in a certain order.

Develop rules that group items in various ways.

Think of new ideas about a topic.

Recognize when important changes happen or are likely to happen in a system.

Identify what must be changed to reach goals.

Concentrate and not be distracted while performing a task.

Think of original, unusual, or creative ways to solve problems.

Work activities—

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others - Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Provide Consultation and Advice to Others - Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics.

Analyzing Data or Information - Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others - Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Interacting with Computers - Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Assisting and Caring for Others - Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People - Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Performing for or Working Directly with the Public - Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

Training and Teaching Others - Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Coaching and Developing Others - Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills.

Developing and Building Teams - Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members.

Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates - Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.

Developing Objectives and Strategies - Establishing long-range objectives and specifying the strategies and actions to achieve them.

Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others - Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.

Performing Administrative Activities - Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork.

Selling or Influencing Others - Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.

Personality

Work Styles

Importance Styles

Concern for Others - Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.

Integrity - Job requires being honest and ethical.

Cooperation - Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.

Dependability - Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.

Self Control - Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.

Attention to Detail - Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.

Stress Tolerance - Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.

Independence - Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.

Leadership - Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.

Analytical Thinking - Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.

Initiative - Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.

Adaptability/Flexibility - Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.

Achievement/Effort - Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.

Social Orientation - Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.

Persistence - Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.

Innovation - Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.

Work values—

Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.

Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind

employees.

Education

Master's Degree usually needed for this career or certificate after master's

STEPS TO BECOMING A SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST1DO YOUR RESEARCH Even if you have just started working on a bachelor’s degree, it’s never too early to start planning ahead. Research graduate schools that offer school psychology degrees. Zero in on the ones that fit your needs, and make sure they are accredited by the National Association of School Psychologists or the American Psychological Association. Take a look at what is required for acceptance into graduate school--specifically what is required to earn a school psychology degree, what pre-requisites courses are required, minimum GPA and cost of tuition.


2EARN A RELEVANT BACHELOR DEGREE It’s not necessary to earn a bachelor’s degree in psychology in order to be accepted into a school psychology program, however, a bachelor’s degree in psychology or a related degree may better prepare you for a school psychology career. To become certified to work as a school psychologist, most states require individuals have at least a post-master’s degree level of education. By earning a bachelor’s degree in a psychology or related area of study, you may already have some of the pre-requisites for graduate school under your belt.


3GRADUATE SCHOOL In order to work as a school psychologist, you will need to earn an Ed.S (Education Specialist), which is considered a post-master’s degree. Some students enter a graduate program with a bachelor’s degree, while others already have a master’s degree (M.A., M.S. or M.Ed.) and are ready to pursue an education specialist or doctoral degree. Typically, if you are starting graduate school with a bachelor’s degree, you can earn your master’s degree while you are working towards your Ed.S. Furthermore, an Ed.S can be turned into an Ed.D (Doctor of Education) or Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy), if you decide to go all the way. The education specialist degree is a great option for those who know they want to pursue a school psychology career working with school aged children, while earning a doctoral degree gives a few more options, especially to those wanting an emphasis on research.


4PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION Although not a requirement in all states, a National Certified School Psychologist (NCSP) credential is standard for school psychology professionals. Requirements for the NCSP credential include a graduate degree in school psychology, preferably from a NASP-approved program; a 1,200-hour internship program, of which at least 600 hours must be in a school setting, and a passing score on the Praxis II school psychology examination. A certain amount of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) hours are required to maintain NCSP certification.


5BECOME LICENSED Following NCSP certification, graduates apply for licensure in the state where they wish to work. Employment in a public school setting generally requires certification by the state’s department of education. Many state licensure requirements mirror those of the NCSP credential, and certain states use proof of NCSP certification as a minimum requirement for a license to practice.Requirements vary from state to state, so interested students should research them as early as possible, preferably before beginning the postsecondary education process.

Job outlook –

School psychologists help students with learning and behavioral problems. They work with teachers and parents to improve a student’s school experience.

Occupations

Social Workers

School Counselors

Instructional Coordinators

Psychiatrists

Psychologists

Special Education Teachers

University and College Teachers

Mental Health Counselors

Marriage and Family Therapists

Occupation Cluster

Human Services

Source: Illinois Career Information System (CIS) brought to you by Illinois Department of Employment Security.

Salary—

The average salary for a School Psychologist is ₹ 31,743 per month in India. Salary estimates are based on 6 salaries submitted anonymously to Indeed by School Psychologist employees, users, and collected from past and present job advertisements on Indeed in the past 36 months.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is some good advice for school psychology students?

Discover the area of psychology for which you have a passion.

Learn outside of the classroom by using additional books and the internet.

Find local associations/psychology chapters and discover the information they have available for students.

Get involved in internships.

Participate in research studies.

Prior to enrolling in graduate school, explore all aspects of a career in psychology.

Realize that this is a lifelong learning process.

Be patient.

Participate.

Ask questions.

Seek to clarify topics.

Read all assigned materials.

Think critically about course content.

Be a student the professor would be happy to recommend for a job.

Be able to take research and apply it to methods of practice.

Nurture within yourself a deep interest and curiosity in the class content in order to make it (and you) come alive.

What are the various school psychologist designations?

Provisional Certificate: Requires a BA, 60 graduate credits in psychology, and a 1-year school psychology internship (at least 600 hours in school setting). Permanent Certificate: Requires a provisional credential plus an MA degree and 2 years of work experience in the schools.

What is it like being a school psychologist?

DescriptionSchool psychology is a field that applies principles of educational psychology, developmental psychology, clinical psychology, community psychology, and applied behavior analysis to meet children's and adolescents' behavioral health and learning needs in a collaborative manner with educators and parents.

What is the difference between a school psychologist and educational psychologist?

One difference between a school psychologist and an educational psychologist is that school psychologists are trained to work directly with children who have learning and behavioral issues; educational psychologists concentrate on the “macro". Often educational psychologists are researchers.

What is the difference between a counsellor and a school psychologist?

The difference lies in the fact that counselors offer a more general service, while psychologists are more specialized. ... The minimum requirement to become a school psychologist is usually a master's degree in psychology or a more specialized discipline, such as school psychology or educational psychology.

How difficult is it to become a School psychologist?

Yes, it is a high-stress job and yes, you do a lot of report writing but it is not that difficult to find a job and there are a lot of positives in the field. ... In some cases, school psychology involves a big counseling component, while in others it is more of a central office kind of job.

Is school psychology an art or a science?

The short answer to the question of whether psychology is an art or science is “yes.” In many ways, it is both. There are branches within psychology that are strictly devoted to the understanding the human mind and behavior through rigorous scientific experimentation.

Is it worth it to study school psychology?

Yes, but only if you love it. Studying human behavior, culture, and society is by far the most fascinating topic in the world. If you get involved with it deeply enough, you will eventually not be able to go a single day without learning more about it.

Are School psychologist happy?

A job with a low stress level, good work-life balance and solid prospects to improve, get promoted and earn a higher salary would make many employees happy. Here's how School Psychologists job satisfaction is rated in terms of upward mobility, stress level and flexibility.

Should I become a school psychologist?

Suitable Personality

Best personality for this career

The Thinkers and The Helpers

People who are suitable for this job tends to like working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. They like searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

They also like working with, communicating with, and teaching people. They like helping or providing service to others.

You can read more about these career personality types here.

Typical Day

School Psychologists investigate processes of learning and teaching and develop psychological principles and techniques applicable to educational problems.

Here is what a typical day’s work for a School Psychologist looks like:

Compile and interpret students’ test results, along with information from teachers and parents, to diagnose conditions and to help assess eligibility for special services.

Maintain student records, including special education reports, confidential records, records of services provided, and behavioral data.

Report any pertinent information to the proper authorities in cases of child endangerment, neglect, or abuse.

Select, administer, and score psychological tests.

Interpret test results and prepare psychological reports for teachers, administrators, and parents.

What are School psychologists like?

School psychologists provide mental health services that address needs at home and school to help students succeed academically, emotionally, and socially. They are specially trained to link mental health to learning and behavior.

What are the professional courses one can pursue as a school psychologist?

Clinical Psychologists

Counseling Psychologists

Genetic Counselors

Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary

Psychiatrists

You might like a career in one of these industries:

Education

Health & Counseling

YouTube Links for further reference:


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